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Hundreds rally at city event to protect all life

Culture of life: A large crowd gathered at the Rally for Life at Queens Park last weekend to protect life at all stages. Photo: Alan Edgecomb

Culture of life: A large crowd gathered at the Rally for Life at Queens Park last weekend to protect life at all stages. Photo: Alan Edgecomb

PROTECTING  life at all ages was a key message for the hundreds of people attending the Rally for Life in Bisbane’s CBD last weekend.

In a letter of support to the rally,  Brisbane Archbishop Mark Coleridge said:  “I cannot be with you, not only to protest the violation of life, but also to celebrate life as the blessing which it is.

“It is troubling when the blessing of life is seen as a curse, when death is seen as preferable to life,” he wrote.

The absence of pro-abortion protesters at this year’s Rally for Life has been pronounced “a mixed blessing” by organiser Cherish Life Queensland president Teresa Martin.

“These protesters can be very loud and aggressive at times during these rallies,” Ms Martin said. “But when they stop their shouting, they start listening to what the speakers are saying.

“In this way, these protesters get to hear the pro-life message.”

Ms Martin said the rally “had nothing on the downside”.

Speakers at the rally, held on Saturday, February 22, in Queens Park were Right to Life Australia president Margaret Tighe, Queensland Australian Christian Lobby state director Wendy Francis and father of a child with Down syndrome Tim Rushbrook (pictured with his son Jireh).

Members of the clergy from Catholic and other Christian denominations attended, including two priests from Toowoomba diocese.

Ms Martin also read an apology from Brisbane Archbishop Mark Coleridge.

He sent his greetings and his apology that “I cannot be with you, not only to protest the violation of life, but also to celebrate life as the blessing which it is.

“It is troubling when the blessing of life is seen as a curse, when death is seen as preferable to life,” he wrote.

“It is also troubling when a society which speaks almost obsessively of human rights denies the most basic right of all – the right to life – upon which all other rights are built.”

Mrs Tighe encouraged those at the rally “to keep up your opposition to the tragic destruction of human life that occurs in Australia today”.

“Some say we live in a lucky country – and in many ways we do,” she said.

“But there is a silent group of human beings in Australia today who have no rights, who are denied the very basic of human rights – the right to life itself.

“I speak here of the well over 100,000 unborn Australians who are carelessly disposed of in government-funded abortions each year.

“To our great shame, in some states – Victoria, Tasmania and the ACT – these children can be killed right up to birth.”

Ms Francis in her talk spoke of the sanctity of life and the deaths of her two sisters from cancer.

“I have experienced walking that journey to death with two people who I love dearly,” Ms Francis said. “And there was pain and joy in the journey.

“But through it all, the overwhelming emotion that I experienced was the great privilege I had in caring for them.”

Mr Rushbrook introduced his two-year-old son Jireh, with Down syndrome, with the message that such children are as valuable as any others.

He spoke of Jireh’s “extremely high value” to his family and others.

View the photo gallery below (click to enlarge):

Photos: Alan Edgecomb

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